Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi visits U.S. Elections class

Roughly three weeks after Pete Buttigieg came to class, another prominent figure appeared in the historically large class.

Speaker+of+the+House+Nancy+Pelosi+made+a+Zoom+appearance+in+U.S.+Elections+class+on+Sept.+22.+%28Hustler+Staff%2FScreenshot+by+Immanual+John+Milton%29

Immanual John Milton

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi made a Zoom appearance in U.S. Elections class on Sept. 22. (Hustler Staff/Screenshot by Immanual John Milton)

Logan Cromeens and Immanual John Milton

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi made a surprise Zoom appearance in the U.S. Elections class on Sept. 22.

Pelosi addressed questions from Carolyn T. and Robert M. Rogers Chair in American Presidency Jon Meacham about a variety of topics. The topics themselves, as with any guest speaker in the class, are considered off the record. 

This is not the first national politician to visit the historically-large class. Ex-Presidential Candidate Pete Buttigieg was also a surprise guest on Sept. 3, however, students including senior Ellie Ward were surprised by the Speaker of the House. Students had some advance warning for Buttigieg’s virtual arrival.

“We had absolutely no clue,” Ward said. “Meacham just kind of introduced, out of the blue, that the special guest speaker was going to be Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.”

Pelosi represents the 12th District of California in the United States House of Representatives. She is the 52nd Speaker of the House and the first woman to serve in that position. 

Other students, including junior Schuyler Kresge, spoke highly of the Speaker’s remarks.

“It was incredible to have the Speaker of the House as a guest lecturer today. She’s one of the most influential figures in politics in my lifetime and is third in line to the presidency,” Kresge said.

Junior Miguel Reyna said Pelosi’s passion in politics was evident. Reyna said he loves hearing from the professors and guest speakers, but he believes that some voices might not be heard as equally.

“Even though I would say I’m more left-leaning, I would still like to hear from the other side too—which the professors have said they are trying to make an effort towards,” Reyna said.

Several students spoke about the status of the guests that were appearing in the U.S. Elections class.

“I’ve just been impressed by how big the names have been,” Ward said.