The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University

The Vanderbilt Hustler

The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University.
Since 1888
The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University

The Vanderbilt Hustler

The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University.
The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University

The Vanderbilt Hustler

The official student newspaper of Vanderbilt University.

Tiny Dorm Concert: Amelia Day’s ‘Queer contemplative folk-pop’ performance.

The Vanderbilt Hustler brings back Tiny Dorm Concerts, with Amelia Day performing melodies crafted in revolution and evolution.
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Jaylan Sims
Graphic cover for Tiny Dorm Concert Cover (Hustler Multimedia/Jaylan Sims)

In a unique and intimate performance, Vanderbilt senior and singer-songwriter Amelia Day performs her folk-pop tunes for The Hustler’s first Tiny Dorm Concert of the year. Day’s performance offered a glimpse into her musical creativity, showcasing her distinct blend of queer contemplative folk-pop, which is inspired by personal experiences and poignant reflections.

Day began the concert by performing “Therapist’s Wet Dream” from her EP “Little One,” a song introduced with self-deprecating humor and a lighthearted tone. Day explained that not all songs need to be complex and that some are meant to be enjoyable. The mid-tempo rhythm and charming lyrics give the song a folk tune-like quality. 

Transitioning seamlessly into “Skipping Down the Sidewalk,” Day shared her perspective on the importance of having fun and enjoying the little things in life, highlighting the contrast between societal expectations and the joy of embracing simple pleasures. 

Following her previous song, Day performed “Alma Mater,” which evokes a sense of nostalgia, forcing Day to remember the bittersweet feeling of her drifting love from her hometown, Seattle. Day explained that the tune was written through the lens of a past relationship that she was in. The composition effortlessly intertwined personal narratives with broader themes of growth and identity.

Day finished the concert with one of her favorites, “Eastward of Eden,” a composition inspired by her studies at Vanderbilt in climate change. Day explained that the melody explores a mythological allegory.

“It’s an imagined mythology of the rise and fall of humanity,” Day said.

In a post-concert interview, Day expressed her pride in this particular creation, describing it as the kind of storytelling you can only write once. 

“It speaks to larger issues that are impactful, a bit deeper–poignant and pertinent,” Day said. 

When asked about her musical inspiration, Day revealed that her melodies often stem from personal experiences, intriguing concepts, or sounds that resonate with her. Describing her music in three words — “queer, contemplative, folk-pop” — Day emphasized the influence of her upbringing in the natural landscapes of Seattle.

Day hopes that listeners realize that each song is contingent on the message, a medium for introspection and dialogue. Each song invites listeners to reflect on themes ranging from coming-of-age experiences to broader societal critiques, including reflections on capitalism and personal fulfillment. 

“It’s important not to throw away your past; it’s still you,” Day said. 

Looking towards the future, Day shared her aspirations of pursuing music full-time. She dreams of touring with her band, connecting with diverse audiences globally and fostering a collaborative community of fellow musicians and fans. Her vision extends beyond performance as she aims for a collaborative community to help showcase her melodies. 

Looking ahead, Day announced an upcoming show at EXIT/IN on Wednesday, April 17, at 7 p.m. CDT. EXIT/IN is within walking distance from the Vanderbilt campus and Day encourages her growing audience to join her for another immersive musical experience.

Day’s authenticity, musical talent and thought-provoking lyrics will likely impact everyone fortunate enough to see her perform live. Amelia Day is undoubtedly a name to look out for in indie folk-pop as she continues pursuing her musical aspirations.

Songs performed on this Tiny Dorm Concert (Embeds via Spotify): 

Podcasts Director Jaylan Sims contributed to the filming and editing of this video.

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About the Contributors
Jada Mitchum
Jada Mitchum, Podcasts Music Correspondent
Jada Mitchum (‘27) is from Atlanta and is majoring in human organizational development and law, history and society in the College of Arts of Science. She loves to read, snuggle in bed to watch “Scandal” and laugh at TikTok videos. You can reach her at [email protected].
Semmie Lee
Semmie Lee, Deputy Podcasts Editor
Semmie Lee (‘27) is from Clarksville, Md., and studies secondary education and cognitive studies in Peabody College. Outside of The Hustler, you can find her jamming out to her daylist playlist, catching bugs for her “Animal Crossing” villagers or pondering over her next scrumptious meal of the day. You can reach her at [email protected].
Jaylan Sims
Jaylan Sims, Podcasts Editor
Jaylan Sims ('26) is from Chattanooga, Tenn., majoring in communication studies and communication of science and technology with a minor in Jewish studies in the College of Arts & Science.  When not working for The Hustler, you can catch Jaylan aimlessly roaming around campus. He can be reached at [email protected]

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